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Neurology
Ophthalmology

Retinal abnormalities show promise as non-invasive diagnostic tool for dementia

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Retinal abnormalities detected through optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography (OCTA) show promise as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for neurodegenerative disorders, particularly Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI), according to a study.

The study identifies the superior peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) as a trustworthy biomarker for identifying most cases of Alzheimer’s disease, but it highlights its limitations in detecting mild AD and MCI.

In addition, the global pRNFL is identified as a reliable biomarker for discriminating frontotemporal dementia from mild AD and healthy controls.

However, the study emphasizes the need for further research to determine the most effective biomarkers, especially for early and mild stages of Alzheimer’s disease.

Reference
Ibrahim Y, Xie J, Macerollo A, et al. A Systematic Review on Retinal Biomarkers to Diagnose Dementia from OCT/OCTA Images. J Alzheimers Dis Rep. 2023;7(1):1201-1235. doi: 10.3233/ADR-230042. PMID: 38025800; PMCID: PMC10657718.

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