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Journal Scan
Ophthalmology

Visual outcomes change with presence of SRD, MFC in posterior sympathetic ophthalmia

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The presence of serous retinal detachment (SRD) or multifocal choroiditis (MFC) may help classify posterior sympathetic ophthalmia (PSO), according to a study that found the visual prognosis between these types of PSO differed significantly.

In this retrospective review, the clinical and optical coherence tomographic (OCT) features of 48 patients with PSO were compared between the different clinical types of PSO.

Approximately 85% of patients (n = 41) had SRD and 14% (n = 7) had MFC.

In patients with MFC, the latent period was significantly longer and the final visual acuity was significantly worse than patients with SRD.

The mean height of retinal detachment in the fovea in patients with acute SRD was 528.8 ± 437.5 μm. Retina reattachment occurred in all patients after treatment and most patients (92.7%) had band structures of the outer retina restored.

Inflammatory lesions on the retinal pigment epithelium layer were noted on the OCT images of patients with acute MFC. After treatment

In patients with acute MFC, the OCT images revealed inflammatory lesions on the retinal pigment epithelium layer. Hyperreflective fibrosis of the lesions and loss of the outer retinal band structures were seen on the OCT images of all patients.

Reference
Zhuang H, Zhang R, Zhang T, et al. Clinical classification, visual outcomes, and optical coherence tomographic features of 48 patients with posterior sympathetic ophthalmia. Orphanet J Rare Dis. 2022;17(1):103. doi: 10.1186/s13023-022-02258-0. PMID: 35246199.

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