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Journal Scan

Progressive Multiple Sclerosis Associated with Faster Retinal Atrophy

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Progressive multiple sclerosis is associated with faster retinal atrophy, according to a study published in the Annuals of Neurology.

This study used serial optical coherence tomography (OCT) to follow 178 patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS), 186 progressive multiple sclerosis (PMS), and 66 control participants for a median of 3.7 years

The estimated proportion of peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (pRNFL) thinning in multiple sclerosis (MS) attributable to normal aging increased from 42.7% at age 25 years to 83.7% at age 65 years. Macular ganglion cell + inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) thinning increased from16.7% at age 25 years to 81.1% at age 65 years.

Compared to RRMS, PMS was associated with faster pRNFL and GCIPL, independent of age.

Higher baseline age was associated with faster inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer thinning in patients with MS and the control participants. Inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer thinning were independently faster in patients with PMS compared to control participants.

The authors concluded that, inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer measures are potential biomarkers of neurodegeneration in patients with PMS that appear unresponsive to conventional disease‐modifying therapies.

 

Reference

Sotirchos ES, Caldito NG, Filippatou A, et al. Progressive multiple sclerosis is associated with faster and specific retinal layer atrophy. Ann Neurol. 2020;87:885–896.

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