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Journal Scan
Oncology

Coffee consumption linked to lower risk of disease progression in colorectal cancer

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In patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer, drinking more coffee was associated with lower risk of disease progression and death, according to a study in JAMA Oncology.

In this prospective observational cohort study, 1171 patients with previously untreated locally advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer reported their daily dietary intake. All patients were enrolled in a phase 3 trial comparing the addition of cetuximab and/or bevacizumab to standard chemotherapy.

The median follow-up time was 5.4 years among living patients; 93% of patients died or had disease progression. Increased consumption of coffee was associated with decreased risk of cancer progression (hazard ratio [HR] for 1-cup/day increment, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.91-1.00; P  =  0.04 for trend) and death (HR for 1-cup/day increment, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.89-0.98; P  =  0.004 for trend).

Compared to patients who did not drink coffee, those who had 2 or 3 cups a day had a multivariable HR for overall survival of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.67-1.00) and for progression-free survival of 0.82 (95% CI, 0.68-0.99) and those who had at least 4 cups of coffee per day had a multivariable HR for OS of 0.64 (95% CI, 0.46-0.87) and for PFS of 0.78 (95% CI, 0.59-1.05). These associations were found in both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee.

Reference

Mackintosh C, Yuan C, Ou F, et al. Association of coffee intake with survival in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. JAMA Oncol. Published online September 17, 2020. doi:10.1001/jamaoncol.2020.3938

 

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